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Hum Aapke Hain Koun

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Typesetting the text (above) and the final product after printing (bottom)

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After working on the Of Color Expanded Conversation exhibit, I found that my broadside idea was inspired by the concept of each book asking and answering the question in some form or another of Who am I? Each artist used their book to answer that question of “who am I” through different areas of their lives; some being gender related, some class related, some race related, but regardless each of the books asked that question. 

The book that I chose for the exhibit It Doesn’t Get Any Better Than This by Shana Agid, helped me to see and make that connection for she as a trans woman was also trying to answer the question of who she was. And it got me thinking about my own self and my own identity and who I am. Who am I to you?

So my idea for the broadside is a profile picture of a South Asian woman dressed in traditional Indian clothing, painted by my dear friend Japmeet Sadhu, with the title of a famous Bollywood movie below her that says “Hum Aapke Hain Koun?” or “Who Am I to You?”. I am trying to push people to begin thinking about South Asian women and their oppression as important as well, because sometimes I feel like there is a disconnect between different minority groups and people of color when it comes to standing in solidarity with one another. There seems to be a divide even among oppressed groups because even they are competing it seems to see who is more oppressed than the other, who is struggling more. And often times the South Asian community gets overlooked and I would like to bring light to that issue. That South Asian women are dealing with large amounts of oppression and it’s time that their issues be heard. 

- Zara Singh, Scripps College '20

 

Hum Aapke Hain Koun